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THE GIFT OF PRECOCITY

Dec 1, 2017 | BLOGGER, News, Media & Society | 0 comments

Alexandra Pfeiffer

Born in Argentina, from a Germanic mother and naturalized British. Living in France for quite a while. I left my art vocation to become a specialized Senior Manager at large International Groups. And now leaving it all behind to go back to art and international event organization activities.

Latest posts by Alexandra Pfeiffer (see all)

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The surprise of discovering who you really are...

When I was 5 years old my mother took me to a psychologist because the school teacher had told her that I did not play with the other kids (which she found not normal).

I passed some tests and the psychologist was very reassuring, “she is just to mature for her age” she said. And that was all. We did not talk about it anymore and no importance was given to the fact that I had “A”s at school systematically . Actually my step father used to say that it was a signal of the school level “decadence”.

It was always funny to me to see how people struggled around me to achieve things that I would do without any effort, but I used to think that I was just lucky.

I remember having a friend of mine going on about me talking on television about my projects to encourage other women or young people, but I would just not realize what was that “fantastic”  thing I was doing that was worth talking publicly about it.

All this to say, that when I read on LinkedIn that people promote themselves professionally as “surdoués” (gifted) makes me wonder what they think that this “quality” really means both in society and at work.

I found a text that appeared on an online magazine some time ago and I thought I will share it with you:

“The more I learnt about the topic, the more my way of functioning in my childhood and my adolescence came back to my memory: the curiosity, the speed of comprehension, the rejection of the authority, a fundamental doubt, the feeling of not being like the others, the need to gather a lot of information in bulk without ordering them in a linear way to get me a global idea of a subject, the mania to wait until the last moment to reach the result, almost like a challenge … “

“The gifted are not superior but different. I hate the words “precocious”, “high potential”, “gifted”, and those numbers that measure us: they are inappropriate to describe our reality.”

“We are not superior, we are different. Our true singularity is our way of thinking, of feeling: we do not take the same paths as most people to achieve the same results. In the books that allowed me to begin to understand, we are called “zebras”. I’m fine with this definition: this word does not say that we are “more” or “less”, it says that we are “other”. And that zebra stripes are like our fingerprints: they change from one individual to another. That’s how we can differentiate and recognize them. “

Alexandra Pfeiffer

Born in Argentina, from a Germanic mother and naturalized British. Living in France for quite a while. I left my art vocation to become a specialized Senior Manager at large International Groups. And now leaving it all behind to go back to art and international event organization activities.

Latest posts by Alexandra Pfeiffer (see all)

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