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WHAT WE DO NOT TEACH KIDS ABOUT SEX

Jan 17, 2018 | BLOGGER, Body & Mind | 0 comments

Alexandra Pfeiffer

Born in Argentina, from a Germanic mother and naturalized British. Living in France for quite a while. I left my art vocation to become a specialized Senior Manager at large International Groups. And now leaving it all behind to go back to art and international event organization activities.

Latest posts by Alexandra Pfeiffer (see all)

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WHAT WE DO NOT TEACH KIDS ABOUT SEX

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Sense education, learning to articulate sensations from a young age

Over the last weeks there has been a lot going on about women and their need to be admired but respected in a professional world. This is a very delicate and difficult subject. However, most of us will recognize that the way women and men are educated has a definite influence on the problems women face in society every day.

A lot has been said about awareness. We grow up and become aware of certain subjects, needs, obstacles. This can be a complex process and more and more “coaches” propose us advice and help. How about starting from the begining by teaching our kids to experience a strong relation to their own bodies.

I would like to share with you the following TEDTalk of Sue Jaye Johnson, a journalist, filmmaker and writer, who explores the ways cultural expectations shape our public and private behavior.

“As parents, it’s our job to teach our kids about sex. But beyond “the talk,” which covers biology and reproduction, there’s so much more we can say about the human experience of being in our bodies. Introducing “The Talk 2.0,” Sue Jaye Johnson shows us how we can teach our children to tune in to their sensations and provide them with the language to communicate their desires and emotions — without shutting down or numbing out. (This talk was presented at an official TED conference)”

Alexandra Pfeiffer

Born in Argentina, from a Germanic mother and naturalized British. Living in France for quite a while. I left my art vocation to become a specialized Senior Manager at large International Groups. And now leaving it all behind to go back to art and international event organization activities.

Latest posts by Alexandra Pfeiffer (see all)

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