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WHAT WE DO NOT TEACH KIDS ABOUT SEX

Jan 17, 2018 | BLOGGER, Body & Mind | 0 comments

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A lot has been said about awareness. We grow up and become aware of certain subjects, needs, obstacles. This can be a complex process and more and more “coaches” propose us advice and help. How about starting from the begining by teaching our kids to experience a strong relation to their own bodies.

I would like to share with you the following TEDTalk of Sue Jaye Johnson, a journalist, filmmaker and writer, who explores the ways cultural expectations shape our public and private behavior.

“As parents, it’s our job to teach our kids about sex. But beyond “the talk,” which covers biology and reproduction, there’s so much more we can say about the human experience of being in our bodies. Introducing “The Talk 2.0,” Sue Jaye Johnson shows us how we can teach our children to tune in to their sensations and provide them with the language to communicate their desires and emotions — without shutting down or numbing out. (This talk was presented at an official TED conference)”

Latest posts by Alexandra Pfeiffer (see all)

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