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GREAT MEN ARE NEVER COMPLETELY UNDERSTOOD

Oct 16, 2017 | News, Media & Society, WRITER | 0 comments

Alexandre Melnik

Born in Moscow, I am an associate professor of geopolitics and academic director at ICN Business School Nancy - Metz. Also an international lecturer on the key issues of the globalization of the 21st century.
Alexandre Melnik

Latest posts by Alexandre Melnik (see all)

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Two films that I have seen these days on TV on Gandhi and Churchill, inspire me this morning the following reflection.

Great men are never completely understood by their contemporaries, on whom they have a head start. As if they were speaking a language that few people understand. A sort of misguidance which borders on madness carried by the inner, intuitive, unconscious voices.

A moral imperative that drives them to go to the end of their approach which may seem at first sight like an aberration.

A transgression that later becomes a norm, almost a banality.

Their work surpasses their persons and their judge is neither a poll nor a press, nor vox populi, nor their family, but the verdict of the posterity, to which they pass, sacrificing their lives on the “altar” of history.

In the Service of Others.

Alexandre Melnik

Born in Moscow, I am an associate professor of geopolitics and academic director at ICN Business School Nancy - Metz. Also an international lecturer on the key issues of the globalization of the 21st century.
Alexandre Melnik

Latest posts by Alexandre Melnik (see all)

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